Newspaper video endangered?

Budget and staff cuts at newspapers mean fewer resources devoted to video storytelling, says Colin Mulvany, multimedia producer at The Spokesman-Review in Spokane, Washington. Video has always been a hard sell at print-centric newspapers, Mulvany notes, but it’s getting even tougher.

Many producers I’ve talked to who invested the time to master video production, now say they just beat their heads against the wall in frustration. Newsroom structures still favor the old ways of doing things. Editors who don’t understand video tend to devalue it.

Does video storytelling have a future at newspapers? Mulvany believes it does, but only at Web-savvy papers that recognize the value of video and are willing to shift resources online to support it.

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3 Comments

  1. I often read the article and then watch the video. Video always complements text – but should not be used entirely on its own – unless of course its for TV viewing!

    Louise

  2. A video is such a heavy carrir of the word such that I SEE it has a great impact in the nespaper industry

  3. It’s weird, but have you ever seen the Wii news channel? It basically throws up the AP Wire on your TV. I think I’ve read more print articles on my TV screen in the last two months than actual print on paper in the last decade. One of these days they’ll put a video feed up there with the articles.

    One problem here. I have yet to see a print photographer who has actual TV story-telling skills. Don’t be fooled. NOT everyone can do it. If not done properly, it’s just as if your Dad is walking around the living room with his new camcorder.
    The print/TV story telling worlds are miles apart. Don’t ever let some management type tell you differently while throwing the word ‘convergence’ around.
    I will crush you print guys under the boot heel of my TV story telling.

    PS:
    We get it out the same day, too~!

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